Toronto Blue Jays Legacies

mfpark

Vlad Guerrero, Jr, son of Hall of Famer Vlad Sr, was injured yesterday--a strained oblique.

Not to worry, Blue Jays fans.  His power was replaced by Cavan Biggio, the young powerful second basement who is the son of Hall of Famer Craig Biggio.  And power was also provided by Bo Bichette, younger son of non-Hall of Famer but pretty good player Dante Bichette, Sr (DB Jr, btw, is a ranked Yankee farmhand).  Bo Bichette is a power hitting shortstop.

That is a lot of baseball legacy on one team.


DaveSchmidt

Personally, I could do without another Carter, if any is lurking.


ml1

there are a lot of legacies around MLB.  If you're the son of a big leaguer, you've got both nature AND nurture on your side.


FilmCarp
ml1 said:
there are a lot of legacies around MLB.  If you're the son of a big leaguer, you've got both nature AND nurture on your side.

 And, more importantly, exposure.  There are lots of very good athletes who just are not in the right spot at the right time.  


mfpark

Still, three top prospect legacies on one team, potentially all being in the Bigs together soon?  Pretty cool.


DaveSchmidt

Speaking of the Blue Jays and legacies, check out the opposing team’s pinch hitters in the sixth:

http://www.espn.com/mlb/boxscore/_/id/340506122


mfpark
DaveSchmidt said:
Speaking of the Blue Jays and legacies, check out the opposing team’s pinch hitters in the sixth:
http://www.espn.com/mlb/boxscore/_/id/340506122

 Yah, but neither are young prospects anymore.....


DaveSchmidt

Neither am I. (Sigh.) Neither am I.


ml1

There are usually a couple of dozen legacies around the minor leagues, so seeing 3 on one team at one time is interesting.  But it's not really mind blowing.


DaveSchmidt

Mind tickling, at least for me. Thanks, mfpark.


ml1
DaveSchmidt said:
Mind tickling, at least for me. Thanks, mfpark.

Yes.

Kind of like the Birthday Pardox parlor trick grin


mfpark
ml1 said:
Yes.
Kind of like the Birthday Pardox parlor trick grin

 I am not a maths guy, but aren't birthdays closer to being randomly distributed across the population while legacies are not?  Seeing a cluster of three who are also highly rated prospects seems like interesting data clumping to me.



ml1
mfpark said:
 I am not a maths guy, but aren't birthdays closer to being randomly distributed across the population while legacies are not?  Seeing a cluster of three who are also highly rated prospects seems like interesting data clumping to me.


 Unless there's evidence that teams specifically target legacy prospects (or teams specifically avoid them), then they would be distributed throughout the league.  Not randomly necessarily, but more arbitrarily, since the best-evaluated prospects theoretically go to the teams with the worse records.

So unless the Toronto front office decided to draft legacy players for some reason, the appearance of three of them on one team is just circumstance.



mfpark
ml1 said:
 Unless there's evidence that teams specifically target legacy prospects (or teams specifically avoid them), then they would be distributed throughout the league.  Not randomly necessarily, but more arbitrarily, since the best-evaluated prospects theoretically go to the teams with the worse records.
So unless the Toronto front office decided to draft legacy players for some reason, the appearance of three of them on one team is just circumstance.


 Yes, but my point is that it is truly astonishing because it has not happened before and may not happen much if ever again.  Even if you put 1000 monkeys in a room with a thousand typewriters for a thousand years and one turned out Shakespearian prose, it would still be an astonishing thing to see and very worthy of note, not something to simply dismiss because of the Law of Birthdays,  I mean, do you ever get any joy out of anything in life, such as random clouds on a blue sky Spring morning?  Or do you simply reduce it all to a random accumulation of water around ionized pieces of dust?



DaveSchmidt
mfpark said:

Even if you put 1000 monkeys in a room with a thousand typewriters for a thousand years and one turned out Shakespearian prose, it would still be an astonishing thing to see and very worthy of note

For the purposes of this thread, I think one Bell, one Boone and one Alomar, maybe with separate rooms (and definitely with conjugal visits), ought to suffice.


ml1
mfpark said:
 Yes, but my point is that it is truly astonishing because it has not happened before and may not happen much if ever again.  Even if you put 1000 monkeys in a room with a thousand typewriters for a thousand years and one turned out Shakespearian prose, it would still be an astonishing thing to see and very worthy of note, not something to simply dismiss because of the Law of Birthdays,  I mean, do you ever get any joy out of anything in life, such as random clouds on a blue sky Spring morning?  Or do you simply reduce it all to a random accumulation of water around ionized pieces of dust?


I get joy out of plenty of things.  But maybe my astonishment threshold is higher.  I mean, I remember taking punch cards to the data center and now I can hold a super computer in my hand!


ml1

for some context, the link below lists all the sons of former MLBers who were drafted in the 2014 draft alone (as well as draftees who have relationships to other MLB personnel).  It's a long list.

https://www.mlb.com/news/family-members-of-former-and-current-major-leaguers-among-those-drafted/c-78364756

it's certainly cool that Toronto has 3 players who were sons of very good or great players, and I don't mean to rain on your parade.  But it's not exactly a miraculous occurrence, given that there are a lot of MLB sons making their way through the minors at any given time.




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